Humber River - Celebrating 20 Years

Welcome to Humber River Stories!

In 1999, the Humber River was officially designated under the Canadian Heritage Rivers System (CHRS) for its significant cultural and recreational values.

The 20th anniversary in 2019 is a major milestone -- and a testament to the dedication of Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA), the Humber Heritage Committee and community members to celebrating, protecting and restoring the cultural, natural and recreational features of the Humber River.

With centuries of rich Indigenous history, the Humber River has been a valuable life force for communities spanning centuries. It is easy to be inspired by the Humber River -- whether by its cultural heritage, historical architecture or natural splendour.



WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

What does the Humber River mean to you? Do you have a favourite spot? Or a special memory associated with the river?

As part of our year of celebrations in 2019, we'll be launching the Humber River Digital Story Map, which will detail the important cultural heritage of the Humber River, the unique natural features, the plentiful recreational opportunities -- and ultimately some of your stories too!

We can't wait to hear from you and share the stories of our river with the rest of Canada.


Welcome to Humber River Stories!

In 1999, the Humber River was officially designated under the Canadian Heritage Rivers System (CHRS) for its significant cultural and recreational values.

The 20th anniversary in 2019 is a major milestone -- and a testament to the dedication of Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA), the Humber Heritage Committee and community members to celebrating, protecting and restoring the cultural, natural and recreational features of the Humber River.

With centuries of rich Indigenous history, the Humber River has been a valuable life force for communities spanning centuries. It is easy to be inspired by the Humber River -- whether by its cultural heritage, historical architecture or natural splendour.



WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

What does the Humber River mean to you? Do you have a favourite spot? Or a special memory associated with the river?

As part of our year of celebrations in 2019, we'll be launching the Humber River Digital Story Map, which will detail the important cultural heritage of the Humber River, the unique natural features, the plentiful recreational opportunities -- and ultimately some of your stories too!

We can't wait to hear from you and share the stories of our river with the rest of Canada.


Many of us have a deep connection with places. Why is the Humber River important to you? Why should we protect it? What does the Canadian Heritage River status mean to you?

Thanks for sharing your story!. Our team will review what you've sent as soon as possible. Once it's been approved for posting, we'll send an email to let you know.

Thanks again!

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  • Florence McDowell's Beloved Humber River

    by M. McDowell, 26 days ago
    Mm1

    Left: Florence with her dad, Sgt. H. W. Smith, Folkstone, spring of 1918.

    Florence's father died in October and she and her mother returned to Canada in November.

    In the spring of 1919 her single parent mother, returned to Mount Dennis, where Florence’s grandparents cared for her at their home, 2 Cliff St. during the day while Mama was at work. 2 Cliff St. was at the top of the ravine overlooking Black Creek valley, had a spring fed well in the yard and a high wooden fence (with a loose board).

    Six year old Florence helped her grandfather with... Continue reading

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  • Building a tradition of family time on the Humber River

    by mlbream, 5 months ago
    Jakeem rock then   version 2

    My family’s connection with the Humber River started more than two decades ago. My husband and I, desperate to get our three rambunctious kids out of the house on weekends, decided to take them to conservation areas within a reasonable drive of our home. The idea was that Joe, Jake, and Em would “run their energy out,” and, upon returning home, we — the parents — would be rewarded with children who would gobble their dinners and, exhausted from a very busy afternoon, go to bed at a reasonable hour.  (To this I now say “ha!”)

    Over the years, we... Continue reading

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